Equanimity & Vulnerabilities – big words to use in Person Centred Planning

Barb Goode, our local plain language expert, says that the point of plain language is not to always use small easy words, but also to expect to learn bigger words by having them explained.  Equanimity is a big word.  Here is what the dictionary says about it: e·qua·nim·i·ty: mental calmness, composure, and evenness of temper, especially in a difficult situation. Equanimity is a hallmark of our supports to folks with disabilities and people who are marginalised.  Sometimes people in our field say, “Everyone assumes I am patient, but I’m not.”  I know the feeling – I was once in a … Continue reading Equanimity & Vulnerabilities – big words to use in Person Centred Planning

PATH and MAPs training

Co-facilitating MAPS and PATH as exemplary forms of person centred planning for individuals, friends and family, teams and organizations Facilitated by Aaron Johannes and Eilidh Nicholson What is MAP or PATH planning? PATH is a process in which a facilitator and a graphic facilitator work with a focal person (or organization or team) and their supporters to create a vision of the best possible future, out of which comes a plan that is always “positive” and “possible,” understood by all and no longer mysterious or scary. By the end of the PATH event the focal person or group has communicated where … Continue reading PATH and MAPs training

#powerofdisability review of Al Etmanski’s new book

“I discovered that people with disabilities have been major players throughout history. If you were to take away their contributions, you wouldn’t recognize the world.” I can’t remember the last time I read a book so quickly.  I’ve heard of people “devouring” books and always wondered about that terminology but now I know how that feels.  I meant to read a few pages – it’s a snowday here, the second dump in a couple of weeks and while the first was much worse, everyone is still tender from black ice and fender-benders and the college is closed, my students are … Continue reading #powerofdisability review of Al Etmanski’s new book

CLBC’s Community Safeguards Projects and 101 Friends

Under Jule Hopkins Community Living B.C. (C.L.B.C.) took on a brave agenda of creating documents related to how people can plan for vulnerability and stay safer in community, which had many different parts.  I continue to think this was really exemplary work that involved many self advocates and families, as well as brought together different groups. Jule was an early believer in our work and we used methods from what is now called CBPR (Community Based Participatory Research) and, together, learned a great deal about how inclusive groups and inclusive research works, and got to work with colleagues and agencies … Continue reading CLBC’s Community Safeguards Projects and 101 Friends

PATH AND MAPS: GAIN CONFIDENCE AND SKILLS IN A COHORT OF OTHERS!

For those who know the method of MAPs and PATH: Make it Easy – more explorations with Aaron Johannes, Eilidh Duncan and Shelley Nessman We have had numerous conversations with many of you who want to dig in and improve your facilitation skills and deepen your understanding of the PATH and MAPs process. We are very excited to announce that on January 18th and 19th we will be offering an opportunity for you to do just that! Join us for 2 days of exploring what it means to be a great facilitator, learn and practice some of those skills with … Continue reading PATH AND MAPS: GAIN CONFIDENCE AND SKILLS IN A COHORT OF OTHERS!

Book Review: People with Intellectual Disabilities: Towards a good life?

Originally posted on 101 Ways to Make Friends:
People with Intellectual Disabilities: Towards a good life?   Kelley Johnson and Jan Walmsley with Marie Wolfe.   The Policy Press, 2010.   About $40.00 Canadian. British researchers Kelley Johnson and Jan Walmsley are well known in the field of disability studies for their innovative work around inclusive research, in which people with disabilities are trained to conduct, record and present research about aspects that are meaningful in their own lives.   Marie Wolfe is an Irish self advocate who “sees it as her vocation” to advocate for the rights of people with intellectual disabilities.   Together they’ve… Continue reading Book Review: People with Intellectual Disabilities: Towards a good life?