Equanimity & Vulnerabilities – big words to use in Person Centred Planning

Barb Goode, our local plain language expert, says that the point of plain language is not to always use small easy words, but also to expect to learn bigger words by having them explained.  Equanimity is a big word.  Here is what the dictionary says about it: e·qua·nim·i·ty: mental calmness, composure, and evenness of temper, especially in a difficult situation. Equanimity is a hallmark of our supports to folks with disabilities and people who are marginalised.  Sometimes people in our field say, “Everyone assumes I am patient, but I’m not.”  I know the feeling – I was once in a … Continue reading Equanimity & Vulnerabilities – big words to use in Person Centred Planning

PATH and MAPs training

Co-facilitating MAPS and PATH as exemplary forms of person centred planning for individuals, friends and family, teams and organizations Facilitated by Aaron Johannes and Eilidh Nicholson What is MAP or PATH planning? PATH is a process in which a facilitator and a graphic facilitator work with a focal person (or organization or team) and their supporters to create a vision of the best possible future, out of which comes a plan that is always “positive” and “possible,” understood by all and no longer mysterious or scary. By the end of the PATH event the focal person or group has communicated where … Continue reading PATH and MAPs training

the stuff of better conversations…

here are six people I admire (in this moment), having great conversations about a transforming world, while in the process of being part of that transformation and “leading” in different ways…  to create the opportunities for better conversations. Russell Brand Charles Eistenstein (google his blog / site too) bell hooks on twitter Kenneth Gergen Al Etmanski (and Vickie and Liz) and the incredible artist Hernan Bas because I needed an artist in here… Continue reading the stuff of better conversations…

#clmooc Learning and Gaming Cycle 3

Many good conversations and makings during this third cycle of #clmooc.   It got me thinking about the stone game, and then I remembered this video I made.  This was one of the first gigs* that I had, in which I was graphically recording what was happening in the room and, in this case, online as the facilitator was on an island across the strait, leading the group in a conversation that began with “the stone game.”  I had just taken some basic training in graphic recording and my only rule was that I wouldn’t say “no” – a game I … Continue reading #clmooc Learning and Gaming Cycle 3