Planning for Vulnerabilities with Self Advocates

Why is there a photograph of Woodlands Institution in a posting about planning for vulnerabilities with self advocates?  Because, once upon a time, our society thought that the best way to keep people safe was to look them away.  Ken Scott, in his historical research article, The BC Public Hospital for the Insane, 1872-1902, writes of the earliest institution being built in 1878 and in 1894, only 16 years later, with a total of 117 patients there was already a royal commission into abuses: . . . to investigate questionable practices . . . when a male patient died after … Continue reading Planning for Vulnerabilities with Self Advocates

Stories about access and cognitive dissonance

“In A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance (1957), Leon Festinger proposed that human beings strive for internal psychological consistency to function mentally in the real world. A person who experiences internal inconsistency tends to become psychologically uncomfortable and is motivated to reduce the cognitive dissonance. They tend to make changes to justify the stressful behavior, either by adding new parts to the cognition causing the psychological dissonance or by avoiding circumstances and contradictory information likely to increase the magnitude of the cognitive dissonance. “Coping with the nuances of contradictory ideas or experiences is mentally stressful. It requires energy and effort to … Continue reading Stories about access and cognitive dissonance

Equanimity & Vulnerabilities – big words to use in Person Centred Planning

Barb Goode, our local plain language expert, says that the point of plain language is not to always use small easy words, but also to expect to learn bigger words by having them explained.  Equanimity is a big word.  Here is what the dictionary says about it: e·qua·nim·i·ty: mental calmness, composure, and evenness of temper, especially in a difficult situation. Equanimity is a hallmark of our supports to folks with disabilities and people who are marginalised.  Sometimes people in our field say, “Everyone assumes I am patient, but I’m not.”  I know the feeling – I was once in a … Continue reading Equanimity & Vulnerabilities – big words to use in Person Centred Planning