A busy month…

I’ve been finishing up a big, distracting project that has required a lot of focus…  for some reason this meant that every time someone asked me to work at an event I just said yes 🙂 Hospitals engaging patients, self advocates strategic planning, MAPs and PATHs and training in California and with teachers in B.C..   It was good to use the other side of my brain, but it was particularly a gift to be around so many interesting people doing so many good things.   And always a gift to spend time with Liz Etmanski, who did some of … Continue reading A busy month…

art power….

Just read this article on working conditions of London maids and in the context of a day off after three days of teaching drawing and a conversation about prospective dissertation methods, I found Barbara Pokryszka’s art in it so powerful.   Part of the conversation about dissertations was about the importance of including our own stories and, for me, using different modalities.  As in Nick Sousanis’ Unflattening – a book I keep wanting to take on a wild weekend to a cabin by the sea! And he’s teaching a class in Calgary.  *SIGH* And all of it is caught up … Continue reading art power….

Bricolage: “Those crunching noises pervading the air!” 1980 #rhizo15

I started thinking that, as in studying an art work one likes, it’s important to know the historical context out of which something came and I began working on this post.  Given that this is the last (?) week of #rhizo15  I realized that, imperfect and incomplete as it is, I better post it.  It was an interesting exploration, not least because I realized how subjective my own sense of the 1980s was…  your history-mileage may vary 🙂 All images except this, the middle one by Jennifer Bartlett and the last one are from 1980(ish) unless otherwise stated. As we investigate … Continue reading Bricolage: “Those crunching noises pervading the air!” 1980 #rhizo15

112 Scott Johnson Quotes: out of context and in no particular order. #rhizo15

“The radical, committed to human liberation, does not become the prisoner of a ‘circle of certainty’ within which reality is also imprisoned. On the contrary, the more radical the person is, the more fully he or she enters into reality so that, knowing it better, he or she can better transform it. This individual is not afraid to confront, to listen, to see the world unveiled. This person is not afraid to meet the people or to enter into dialogue with them. This person does not consider himself or herself the proprietor of history or of all people, or the … Continue reading 112 Scott Johnson Quotes: out of context and in no particular order. #rhizo15

What is the work?

  Dan Pontefract, author of Flat Earth: Creating a Connected and Engaged Organization, was having a contest.   It is over, so I won’t win a book, but I’m going to go buy his book anyway as I really like the way he is thinking about work and connections…  and it gave me a chance to process some of what I was thinking about over the last weeks and last week in particular.  The question he’s asking is “How do you define the word ‘work.’” I was in Toronto taking a refresher course in a planning method we use a … Continue reading What is the work?

The Future is Stupid #rhizo14

SMITH: Your work has a deep sense of privacy to it. But yet you’ve often collaborated with others and you have assistants. There is a comfort in having people to work with. And now you’re even using other people’s language in your works. HOLZER: It can be kind of gruesome at times, making things alone. [laughs] I don’t want to be too dramatic, but it’s hard. It’s necessary to start most work alone. But I’m tickled to death when I can pull somebody in or join someone, whether it’s borrowing poetry or traveling with an associate. Company makes my day. … Continue reading The Future is Stupid #rhizo14

orality, drawing and literacy #rhizo14

“What is that you express in your eyes? It seems to me more than all the print I have read in my life.”  Walt Whitman Dave Cormier, this week in part 4 of Rhizomatic Learning – The community is the curriculum, asks this question: Our connective technologies are, as many have said, a return to orality. It gives us the opportunity to connect our thoughts with others without them being finished, stale and objective. The medium of print, while practically useful for many reasons (particularly historically) encourages the opposite. Is books making us stupid? This took me by surprise and … Continue reading orality, drawing and literacy #rhizo14