The Gap, by Irving Glass

great advice, conveyed very nicely.   this idea is so true in so many situations in which we are learning.   *trying* to learn the guitar and being so bad at it, led to me to completing a Masters degree (what would be easier than this that i’m actually good at?), but it also gave me this whole new sense of how to listen to music and of how instruments and rhythm works…   Given that it was the most unsuccessful learning experience of my life in terms of actually playing an instrument, it was also the most successful learning experience 🙂

Not quite what he’s saying here, but related in that it’s an idea i’ve been thinking about in the world of social services – how do we foster an environment of experimentation and risk-taking within a governmentality that is so focused on risk-aversiveness?  how do we be okay with the mistakes we make?  how do we come to a place where we can look around at what’s happening and see that we’re already making all kinds of mistakes that we need to question more (much more) so that we can be compelled to further experiments and successes…

Thanks Mary Clare Carlson for sending me this video 🙂

THE GAP by Ira Glass from frohlocke on Vimeo.

Published by Aaron

Director of Research, Training and Development, Spectrum Society for Community Living. As well as being responsible for in-house training and research on best practices in the field of helping people with disabilities organize their supports, I support self advocacy groups, contract to provide training and workshops to other agencies and groups and facilitate inclusive research groups. I am the author/illustrator of three books, co-editor of a new anthology for 2012, and co-editor of Spectrum Press. My passion is creating networks of best practice leaders in our field to share person-centred alternatives in how people with disabilities can be facilitated to live lives where their gifts are necessary components in their communities. I am currently half way through a Masters degree in Interdisciplinary studies, focusing on Equity and Adult Education, and particularly on how people with intellectual disabilities may be supported in participatory leadership groups.

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