#clmooc Learning and Gaming Cycle 3

The stone game is a great way to communicate with teenagers :) (given that it involves listening!)

The stone game is a great way to communicate with teenagers 🙂 (given that it involves listening!)

Many good conversations and makings during this third cycle of #clmooc.   It got me thinking about the stone game, and then I remembered this video I made.  This was one of the first gigs* that I had, in which I was graphically recording what was happening in the room and, in this case, online as the facilitator was on an island across the strait, leading the group in a conversation that began with “the stone game.”  I had just taken some basic training in graphic recording and my only rule was that I wouldn’t say “no” – a game I play with myself when I’m entering new territory as I know it is my tendency to want to say no and think I can’t do things.

From afar, David had given each participants a pile of stones and then used them to negotiate a conversation, with them paying attention to their dynamics.  This led them to a very fruitful conversation about their goals and how they were moving forward together.  One of the most brilliant pieces of facilitation I’ve seen and transformational for me…

It began a long lovely recipricol relationship for me with the Family Support Institute of B.C. (I volunteer as much as I can with them and they let me get experimental), was the first of many many graphic recording and facilitation gigs, started us working for a couple of years on projects with David Wetherow, one of my heros who I never expected to work with and a fascination with the stone game, which I’ve used with smaller groups as a facilitation tool.

*While I am now a bit embarrassed by the quality of the graphic recording, it is still one of my favourite sessions and videos.  The distance between what I wanted to do and what I could do compelled me to go learn more 🙂

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

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3 thoughts on “#clmooc Learning and Gaming Cycle 3

  1. tellio says:

    Hands…reminds me of my obsession with hands when I taught in eighth grade. They still had children’s hands and when I was of a mind to get mad at something they had done to anger me, I just looked at their hands. Hands…thanks for the lovely hands.

    • Aaron says:

      what a lovely idea, Terry – thanks – that resonates. Yes, Susan, it’s an amazing, deceptively simple game with transcendent possibilities for learning about oneself I think… requires great facilitation.

  2. Aaron, this is such a nice overview of both your process and the process that went into planning the day. I love the video. 🙂 I read the post about The Stone Game and it is really intriguing.

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